EETimes

Embedded Systems November 2000 Vol13_12

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= c. f = Because the typical home will have one gateway device and many networked appliances, sheer volume potential drives companies and organizations to expend a lot of effort in this area. Possible OSI model for interoperabihty ... • • • • • • ... • • • • • • ... ... .. .. ... Format Security .... .. .... .. ........... ......... .. .. Services provided Encoding, compression, data format encryption ----------- -- - -- - -----------~::::::::::::-:::.: ............. .......... .. .. .... ..... --------- --- --- .. .... ·- ........... _ '•' '' ''' '' '''': :::: ::.~' '.::' TABLE 1 Technology HomePNA HomeRF Home Free 802.11 Bluetooth IEEE 1394 10/100Base·T Homeplug Enikia lntellon I ntelogis Passport Maximum Speed 10Mbps 1 Mbps-2Mbps 1Mbps 2Mbps-11Mbps 7BOKbps 100Mbps- 1.6Gbps 10Mbps-100Mbps 10Mbps 10Mbps 10Mbps 350Kbps 66 NOVEMBER 2000 Embedded Systems Programming Media Phoilellne RF RF RF RF Custom cable/ Cat 5 UTP CatS UTP Powerline Powerline Powerline Powerline Related Standards Or ./Information www.homepna.org www.homerf.org Diamond Multimedia Systems www.leee.org www.bluetooth.org www.1394ta.org www.leee.org www.homeplug.org www.enikia.com www.Jntellori.com www.intelogis.com Comment Lots of industry support. 100Mbps is In the works Supports Isochronous Proprietary Complex, with conflicting implementations Limited distance (10m) 13948 will support Cat. 5 cable, new cabling necessary Can't use existing cabling New standard Proprietary Proprietary Proprietary ''''' .. .......... ·-~------------~-.~ transmission Conversation setup, coordination, and termination arrive out of order. Streaming appli- cations, such as video and audio, require a more consistent through- put. Hence, several efforts are under- way to define and request a certain quali ty of service (QoS) for Internet traffic. In-home networking In-home networking is where a signifi- cant amount of activity is occurring . Because the typical home will have one gateway device and many net- worked appliances, sheer volume potential drives companies and orga- nizations to expend a lot of effort in this area. In-home networking really consists Device and service directory Logical addressing, traffic management of two components-data transport and interoperabili ty. Back when net- works were administered by the white robed high priests of System Administration, system complexity was not much of a problem. Networking protocols were designed using th e OSI seven-layer reference model and details such as netmasks, gateways, and IP and name server addresses were controlled by these gurus. As digital networks start find- ing their way into the normal con- sumer environment, things change quite drastically. Grandma and Grandpa may likely be able to plug in the ubiquitous RCA connector cable from the video-out jack of their VCR to the video-in jack of their television,

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